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From the President:

Sister Peg Albert, OP, PhD, President
Sister Peg Albert, OP, PhD, President

Reflecting on the Dominican Tradition

Recently, I attended the biennial Sponsorship Conference for all the institutions sponsored by the Adrian Dominican Sisters. While attending, I had the opportunity to reflect on leadership and what it means to be a university founded in the Dominican tradition.

The following are some of my thoughts:

Because we are part of a Dominican establishment, we are all family, we are all related. Each of us are leaders in our own way. How do we lead? Is anyone following? When St. Dominic formed the Order in 1214, he believed that the Prior of the Order or the Master General should realize that he was the first among equals. That’s also how I think leaders should see themselves today. When we lead, we must be servant-leaders, putting the needs of the institution/organization/community and the people we serve first.

How do we live the mission of Siena Heights University? Many of us have multiple interactions each day. What is the quality of those interactions? Do we speak with respect and listen with interest, or do we dismiss people as well as what they have to offer? Right relationships must be the foundation on which our mission is built. It can’t be assumed. It is an intentional act. If relationships are off-kilter, then it is difficult to sincerely live our mission. Mission is not something to be written on a piece of paper and tucked away. It is something that must live and breathe, grow and deepen each day.

Read more . . .

From the President:

Sister Peg Albert, OP, PhD, President
Sister Peg Albert, OP, PhD, President

Siena Heights: This is Holy Ground

The University’s theme for this academic year is Contemplation and Action. This year’s Common Dialogue Day is entitled, “Get Some Perspective,” which grew out of the Contemplation and Action theme.

I have a little picture in my office with a line from Psalm 46 which says, “Be still and know that I am God.” Be still, and know, experience, that I am God. This is what I have come to know as contemplation
in my life as a Dominican.

St. Catherine of Siena called it creating your inner cell. Be still, and go to that place within you where God is and speaks Truth to your heart. That truth that flows from contemplation must be shared with our world, and, I believe, that’s when we are compelled to act. Thus, we can see the relationship between contemplation and action.

But what does all of this mean to us as a Dominican higher education institution? We live in a very busy world where we are bombarded with things that distract us. How do we overcome these distractions and spend quiet time to contemplate and reflect on all that goes on around us?

Contemplation can truly influence our perspectives on things. Let me give you an example. The University recently made a statement about those coming across our borders, offering to assist to educate those who may be college-ready, but also challenging our government leaders to act in a responsible, compassionate way.

Read more . . .

From the President:

Sister Peg Albert, OP, PhD, President
Sister Peg Albert, OP, PhD, President

The (Adrian) Dominican Tradition is
Alive and Well

It’s been a year to remember at Siena Heights University.

Of course, all eight or so years I have been at Siena Heights have turned out to be memorable in their own way. But this year, there was a special emphasis on strengthening the Dominican tradition on campus.

Last spring, faculty member Sister Pat Walter, OP, delivered an end-of-the-year address to our faculty and staff on our Catholic identity. Her presentation sparked a newfound interest in just what that “identity” was on our campus. In fact, many of our faculty and staff—some of whom are not even Catholic—wanted to know more about this “Catholic, Dominican tradition.”

This spring, we had a series of luncheon discussions exploring aspects of our Catholic identity. These occurred not only on the Adrian campus, but at some of our other campuses around Michigan.

Integrating the Dominican tradition in a more visible way is also happening with many our academic programs, especially in the liberal arts. And our newly designed Leadership program in the Graduate College will have the Dominican tradition as a focus.

Read more . . .